Marijuana - A More Commonly Used Teen Drug Than Tobacco

A study from the University of Nebraska’s College of Public Health concluded that there are more teens using marijuana and alcohol than there are teens smoking cigarettes.

Researchers looked at marijuana, alcohol, and cigarette use among U.S. teens from 1991 to 2017 and found that the number of teens who said they used marijuana at least once over the past month rose 10-fold, from 0.6% in 1991 to 6.3% in 2017, according to HealthDay reports. The report also states that teens who said they used marijuana and alcohol combined almost doubled, from 3.6% to 7.6%.

During that same time period, high school students who smoked cigarettes dropped from 4.4% to 1.3%.

As marijuana legalization efforts continue and its use becomes more normalized in society, there becomes a greater need for parents and caregivers to have a conversation about marijuana use with their children.

If you are unsure about how to talk about marijuana with your teen, you can use some of these helpful tips from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids:

First, start by getting a better understanding of marijuana and the teen brain. Like other substances, marijuana affects parts of the adolescent brain that are still developing. Using marijuana can impair or permanently damage areas of the brain.

Second, get into an understanding, non-judgmental frame of mind. It helps to approach the conversational with openness and a calm mental state. When a child feels judged or condemned, they can be less receptive of what you have to say.

Third, find a comfortable setting to talk. A conversation that seems more laid-back and casual will lower anxiety (including your own).

If you need additional tips on what to say, you can read some more suggestions from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids here.

A study from the University of Nebraska’s College of Public Health concluded that there are more teens using marijuana and alcohol than there are teens smoking cigarettes.

Researchers looked at marijuana, alcohol, and cigarette use among U.S. teens from 1991 to 2017 and found that the number of teens who said they used marijuana at least once over the past month rose 10-fold, from 0.6% in 1991 to 6.3% in 2017, according to HealthDay reports. The report also states that teens who said they used marijuana and alcohol combined almost doubled, from 3.6% to 7.6%.

During that same time period, high school students who smoked cigarettes dropped from 4.4% to 1.3%.

As marijuana legalization efforts continue and its use becomes more normalized in society, there becomes a greater need for parents and caregivers to have a conversation about marijuana use with their children.

If you are unsure about how to talk about marijuana with your teen, you can use some of these helpful tips from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids:

First, start by getting a better understanding of marijuana and the teen brain. Like other substances, marijuana affects parts of the adolescent brain that are still developing. Using marijuana can impair or permanently damage areas of the brain.

Second, get into an understanding, non-judgmental frame of mind. It helps to approach the conversational with openness and a calm mental state. When a child feels judged or condemned, they can be less receptive of what you have to say.

Third, find a comfortable setting to talk. A conversation that seems more laid-back and casual will lower anxiety (including your own).

If you need additional tips on what to say, you can read some more suggestions from the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids here.
 

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